Staples | Leopard Print Shirt

Leopard is a print that struts down the catwalk season after season. The magazines try to sell it to us as a trend, but I think we can all agree it’s a staple!

Pictured: Gene Tierney in the 1940’s

Source: beautyheaven.com.au

Source: beautyheaven.com.au

In 1925, American film actress Marian Nixon created quite a sensation in the fashion world by matching her new fur coat with her pet. She was seen parading a pet leopard on a leash down Hollywood Boulevard.

Christian Dior’s muse, Mitzah Bricard, was fascinated by leopard print. Dior was the first to use leopard as a print (and not fur) in his 1947 spring-summer collection. Leopard print represented the post-war return to glam and provided a welcome reprieve from fabric rationing after World War II.

Pictured: Mitzah Bricard

Source: theoutfitsofmydreams.blogspot.com

Source: theoutfitsofmydreams.blogspot.com

Wearing leopard print was synonymous with great sophistication and elegance. No woman’s ensemble was complete without a touch of leopard. Iconic screen sirens like Sophia Loren, Brigitte Bardot and Barbra Streisand firmly linked leopard print to luxury as they wore it through the next few decades.

Pictured: Barbra Streisand in the 1960’s

Source: alisonkerr.wordpress.com

Source: alisonkerr.wordpress.com

Italian designer Roberto Cavalli first came onto the fashion scene in the 1970’s and has used leopard print in every collection which has brought him great success.

Source: weheartit.com

Source: weheartit.com

The wild side of animal print appeared in the mid-1970′s. The Punk Rock movement saw leopard print worn with ripped denim and motorcycle jackets. Rebellious music paired with the wild print created an illusion of being sexy and dangerous.

Pictured: Blondie

Source: belldininews.wordpress.com

Source: belldininews.wordpress.com

The 80’s brought leopard print back into glamour mode, worn with diamonds, fur and sequins. This decade of fashion lacked much ‘sophistication’ but leopard print was a symbol of wealth and style.

Pictured: Joan Collins in Dynasty

Source: vogue.co.uk

Source: vogue.co.uk

In the 1990’s leopard print took a fatal turn to trash-town. The print’s rebellious sexiness of the 70’s was mashed with its over-the-top glamour of the 80’s, which resulted in leopard print becoming a symbol of overt sexuality. Characters in TV and film wore leopard print to convey their ‘sexiness’, pop stars turned to leopard print to establish their ‘sex status’.

Pictured: Christina Aguilera

Source: au.thehype.yahoo.com

Source: au.thehype.yahoo.com

Pictured: Fran Drescher in The Nanny

Source: fashionthatpays.wordpress.com

Source: fashionthatpays.wordpress.com

Since the late 2000’s we have seen leopard print regain its allure and today the print stands for sex, sophistication and luxury in equal parts.

Source: fashion.telegraph.co.uk

Source: fashion.telegraph.co.uk

I love leopard print on anything and everything: shoes, bags, skirts, pants, jackets, scarves…anything! However a classic leopard print shirt is something I believe every gal should have in her closet.

This one by Equipment is my favourite:

Source: bloomingdales.com

Source: bloomingdales.com

A leopard print shirt can be dressed up or down, worn with boyfriend jeans or a pencil skirt. The options are endless as leopard print is made up of neutral colours and so is a neutral itself.

Here is some styling inspiration.

Source: asos.com

Source: asos.com

Source: couturecaddy.com.au

Source: couturecaddy.com.au

Source: foros.vogue.es

Source: foros.vogue.es

Source: textstyles.ca

Source: textstyles.ca

Source: stylepantry.com

Source: stylepantry.com

Source: fashionclick.teenvogue.com

Source: fashionclick.teenvogue.com

– CS

Information source: ssense

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